Standard Languages and Language Standards in a Changing Europe – University of Copenhagen

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Kristiansen, Tore & Nikolas Coupland (eds.). 2011. Standard Languages and Language Standards in a Changing Europe, Oslo: Novus Press.

Contents

Introduction

Nikolas Coupland and Tore Kristiansen
SLICE: Critical perspectives on language (de)standardisation, p. 11-35.

Part 1
Community reports (alphabetically ordered by name of community/ language)

Barbara Soukup and Sylvia Moosmüller
Standard language in Austria, p. 39-46.

Frans Gregersen
Language and ideology in Denmark, p. 47-55.

Peter Garrett, Charlotte Selleck and Nikolas Coupland
English in England and Wales: Multiple ideologies, p. 57-65.

Pirkko Nuolijärvi and Johanna Vaattovaara
De-standardisation in progress in Finnish society? p. 67-74.

Jan-Ola Östman and Leila Mattfolk
Ideologies of standardisation: Finland Swedish and Swedish-language Finland, p. 75-82.

Philipp Stoeckle and Christoph Hare Svenstrup
Language variation and (de-)standardisation processes in Germany, p. 83-90.

Stephen Pax Leonard and Kristján Árnason
Language ideology and standardisation in Iceland, p. 91-96.

Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin and Noel Ó Murchadha
The perception of Standard Irish as a prestige target variety, p. 97-104.

Loreta Vaicekauskienė
Language ‘nationalisation’: One hundred years of Standard Lithuanian, p. 105-111.

Stefan Grondelaers and Roeland van Hout
The standard language situation in The Netherlands, p. 113-118.

Helge Sandøy
Language culture in Norway: A tradition of questioning standard language norms, p. 119-126.

Mats Thelander
Standardisation and standard language in Sweden, p. 127-133.

Elen Robert
Standardness and the Welsh language, p. 135-141.

Part 2
Theoretical contributions (alphabetically ordered by name of author)

Jannis Androutsopoulos
Language change and digital media: A review of conceptions and evidence, p. 145-159.

Peter Auer and Helmut Spiekermann
Demotisation of the standard variety or destandardisation? The changing status of
German in late modernity (with special reference to south-western Germany), p. 161-176.

Allan Bell
Leaving Home: De-europeanisation in a post-colonial variety of
broadcast news language, p. 177-198.

Stefan Grondelaers, Roeland van Hout and Dirk Speelman
A perceptual typology of standard language situations in the Low Countries, p. 199-222.

Jane Stuart-Smith
The view from the couch changing perspectives on the role of television in
changing language ideologies and use, p. 223-239.